Birds & Animals

BIRD MOTHERS! For blue tits, a brightly-coloured head is the sign of good motherhood. According to a study by the University of York, female birds with brighter crowns were found to successfully fledge more offspring. The blue on their heads shows up as UV-reflectant in the eyes of other birds, signalling good maternal qualities to prospective mates. These bright birds also demonstrated lower stress levels.
The female blue tit builds the nest herself, then lays around 8-12 eggs (one each day). If she has made a good choice of mate, he will bring her food while she incubates, then both parents feed the chicks until they fledge, usually in early June. #rspb
Read more at https://ift.tt/2JSGEgE

♥️♥️♥️ For all the strong mum’s… may we know them, may we be them, may we raise them.
I look back through my personal history and see a tower of strong women supporting each other to the beginning of time, I look forward and I see the strongest so far in my daughter’s @bethanysrobinson ,& @elliegregor ♥️♥️♥️

Lapwings and Hare.. The lapwing’s call heralded of the start of Spring and many Easter customs are linked to it.  Most birds eggs were eaten at Easter but the lapwing suffered most  being a ground nesting bird,  it became a vast commercial market, Queen Victoria favoured her plover eggs cooked in aspic. Within  20 years they had stripped the whole of the south of England as far as Lincolnshire. Nearing extinction in 1926 the introduction of the Lapwing Act officially stopped this practice although farming practices and habitat loss still drastically threaten them still.

The Easter bunny was originally a Hare but it was so steeped in Pagan folklore that it was deemed ‘unfitting’ for Christian purposes. Hares, hide from predators by making a shallow indentation in the soil known as a form. Lapwings classically inhabit the same territories as hares and make a scrape of a nest on the ground. Lapwings were know to use a hare’s form as a nest and so eggs where often found in a form and occasionally assumed to have been laid by the Hare

Birds & Animals

Lapwings and Hare

The lapwing’s call heralds the start of Spring and many Easter customs are linked to it. in the past most birds eggs were eaten at Easter but the lapwing suffered most  being a ground nesting bird,  it became a vast commercial market, Queen Victoria favoured her plover eggs cooked in aspic.
Within  20 years they had stripped the whole of the south of England as far as Lincolnshire. Nearing extinction in 1926 the introduction of the Lapwing Act officially stopped this practice although farming practices and habitat loss still drastically threaten them still.

So what is the connection to the hare? I posted this a few days ago but it’s worth repeating … The Easter bunny was originally a Hare but it was so steeped in Pagan folklore that it was deemed ‘unfitting’ for Christian purposes. Hares, hide from predators by making a shallow indentation in the soil known as a form. Lapwings classically inhabit the same territories as hares and make a scrape of a nest on the ground. Lapwings were know to use a hare’s form as a nest and so eggs where often found in a form and occasionally assumed to have been laid by the Hare

As we approach easter i like to look up stories about where traditions come from … so here is a thought about the hare.

The Hare and the Lapwing

The Easter bunny was originally a Hare but it was so steeped in Pagan folklore that it was deemed ‘unfitting’ for Christian purposes. Hares, hide from predators by making a shallow indentation in the soil known as a form. Lapwings classically inhabit the same territories as hares and make a scrape of a nest on the ground. Lapwings were know to use a hare’s form as a nest and so eggs where often found in a form and occasionally assumed to have been laid by the Hare.
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This small Hare original painting along with a few others on paper are over in my shop… there is also a 20% off if you use the code MADMARCH until the 31st March 😊

Birds & Animals

We have a pair of buzzards locally who rear young every year. They seem to love this weather and were out soaring on the thermals yesterday evening, some times our 2 are joined by others, I have seen as many as 12 together flying in circles in a tower over the house…always reminds me of the holding patterns that planes form over busy airports … Always wonderful!

Yesterday I had two robins on the garden not together… I thought it quite unusual as they are so territorial…
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There is lots of myths and meanings associated with robins . Apparently they reflect the need to sing your own song and relate to new growth in your life. They always bring to mind my grandad as my mum used to say he always had a robin close by when he as in the garden. ♥️